Native Video: The Major Players & Why YouTube Should Be Scared

Every day, people watch hundreds of millions of hours on YouTube and generate billions of views. Every minute, 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube. Every month, 1 billion unique visitors are watching content on the site.  

Marketers are well aware of video’s impact. In fact, 72% of them used YouTube to market their business in 2014. But, has YouTube’s fame phased out with the evolution of native video launched by Twitter and Facebook? As brands and companies evolve their content marketing strategy, YouTube may have a reason to be scared.

The Impact of Facebook and Twitter Video

It’s too early to know what the economic impact of Facebook and Twitter’s video product means to video, but it’s clear that these new products give marketers new choices in which to distribute their videos. Now, instead of embedding the YouTube code on your site to play video natively within your content, marketers can use Facebook’s code as well.

Why Does It Matter?

Why does it matter where you publish your video?  As the second largest search engine in the world with 3 billion searches per month, it’s clear why YouTube has been the video network of choice for quite some time.  Even so, brands and marketers climb an uphill battle to get their video content viewed, and more importantly, shared.

Facebook’s native video means one very important thing: more eyeballs.

Related Article: Play It Right: Keys to a Successful Online Video Launch

Facebook’s Power Play

Though the option to share video via the social network has been available for some time, Facebook has recently put more of their eggs into the video basket. First, they made algorithm changes that gave more visibility to videos published on Facebook. This change not only gave preferential reach to videos on Facebook, it also downgraded the reach of videos from third-party platforms (i.e. YouTube).

Brands and publishers immediately glommed onto this reach-enhancing shift; Buzzfeed even published their video featuring President Obama on Facebook instead of YouTube. Digiday shared the insight that “as of November [2014], native Facebook videos accrued 80 percent of total interactions on the platform’s video posts, leaving just 20 percent for YouTube and other video formats, according to social media analytics startup Socialbakers.”

native Facebook videos accrued 80 percent of total interactions on the platform’s video posts, leaving just 20 percent for YouTube and other video formats

On March 25, Facebook used their F8 developer conference to announce that videos published within their platform would now have the ability to be embedded elsewhere on the web.

With the one-two punch of increased organic reach and embeddable video, Facebook is now a threat to YouTube’s monopoly on the video game.

Twitter: Not to Be Outdone

Twitter has long supported the sharing of video. Their 6-second, viral video-making machine, Vine, still has a strong foothold in the market, and their newest addition, Periscope, allows users to live broadcast to their Twitter feed. On top of these efforts, Twitter will soon be expanding its video capabilities to native.

As reported in TechCrunch, “The Twitter Video Player will host videos of up to 10 minutes with no limit on file size, initially supporting mp4 and mov files. There will be no ability to edit videos or schedule them within the player; at least in its first iteration. And, pointedly, the Twitter Video Player will not support videos hosted on YouTube or anywhere else, just those on its own service.”

Twitter continues to look for ways to reach new users and re-engage current users as their numbers have begun to decline. Beyond that, the focus is on expanding their advertising product suite.

Related Article: Seeing is Believing: How to Use Web Videos to Improve Your Bottom Line

What Does It All Mean for YouTube?

To be clear, the assumption that native video on Facebook or Twitter will kill YouTube is incorrect. YouTube is a destination for video, and the engaged users within the platform are not going to jump ship to Facebook or Twitter anytime soon, if not for any reason other than discovery.

What’s most important to note, though, is that views and metrics are looked at differently on each platform and therefore cannot be compared side-by-side.

As reported in Digiday, “Facebook, which autoplays videos in the news feed, counts three seconds of viewership as a view. And if you go back and watch that video again, that’s another view. For YouTube to register a view, you need to actively click (or tap) play on a video. And if you return to it later (on the same connection), YouTube won’t add to the video’s total view count.”

For marketers, this seemingly subtle difference is actually glaring, and will aid in maintaining YouTube’s value and relevance.

The Key to Opening Content’s Lock? Content Distribution

As editor in chief at Business.com, paid distribution of our content is equally as important as the production of content. With Facebook’s constant algorithm changes, and Google promoting their own content over others, content distribution requires an aspect of paid promotion in order to reach earned media.

As a rule, we don’t pay to distribute all content-our approach is to only promote stories that have proven successful organically first. It’s very similar to the approach that brands like Kraft take when using Pinterest as a sounding board for choosing the most popular images before they use them in their magazine or in commercials. For us, after an article reaches a certain organic threshold, we weave it into our paid distribution plan.

So while content is king, distribution is like parliament-it holds all the power. Here are some of the top platforms that we have found successful, and others you may want to consider. (more…)

The Key to Opening Content’s Lock? Content Distribution

the key to content success is distributionAs editor in chief at Business.com, paid distribution of our content is equally as important as the production of content. With Facebook’s constant algorithm changes, and Google promoting their own content over others, content distribution requires an aspect of paid promotion in order to reach earned media.

As a rule, we don’t pay to distribute all content—our approach is to only promote stories that have proven successful organically first. It’s very similar to the approach that brands like Kraft take when using Pinterest as a sounding board for choosing the most popular images before they use them in their magazine or in commercials. For us, after an article reaches a certain organic threshold, we weave it into our paid distribution plan.

So while content is king, distribution is like parliament—it holds all the power. Here are some of the top platforms that we have found successful, and others you may want to consider.

Content Distribution for Page Views

If your goal is just to drive page views and nothing more, Facebook, Outbrain and Taboola have worked for us. But, here’s the catch: if you have a smaller team and want a managed solution, SimpleReach is that solution. They work with 100+ publishers and have a predictive algorithm to determine how many social referrals an article will drive based on the acceleration of social sharing and resulting page views. Though we’ve occasionally seen bugs in the interface and discrepancies in the data, overall they are very customer-facing and a perfect managed solution if you are trying to drive page views and determine which pieces of content are resonating with the social audience.

According to Kent Krekorian, VP of Operations, they are “the only platform with code on-page, giving them the ability to close the loop between what’s happening on distribution channels and your site, optimizing paid distribution for content that maximizes organic traffic. To me, focusing on prediction and real-time adjustment is much more effective than looking in the past and determining what worked.

If you have internal resources available, Facebook, Outbrain and Taboola interfaces are all very user-friendly, targeted and allow you to optimize bids and content based off audience.

Content Distribution for Brand Credibility and Direct Visits

If you are looking for ways to increase your brand awareness, drive direct visits, increase demand generation inquiries, and build direct traffic to the site, Nativo and Flipboard have solutions for all three.

Flipboard aggregates content through links culled from users’ social media accounts and has 150 million users digesting content. Up until recently, Flipboard was only designed for tablets and smartphones, but just announced a new application tailored for desktop. In November, they reported that their readers were flipping about 8 billion pages per month. That’s a lot of pages. For more on publishing and advertising with Flipboard, they have a nice, clean Q & A section here.

Nativo is a straight native placement play. You won’t get traffic back to your site as the content resides natively within the publisher’s site. This one that, in theory, is really interesting, here’s the problem I have with it.: native ads can’t be the same piece of content and a mechanical distribution. Native placements must be placed and crafted specifically for the audience that it’s serving.

Producing unique creative for each placement is expensive. If other companies are successfully using the same creative placed natively in various publishers, I want to know how they’re doing it, and replicate it quick.

Content Syndication Only

If you are looking for true syndication only, Newscred and a handful of others do this well. The problem is that most sites don’t handle syndication properly and doesn’t adhere to Google’s guidelines and recommendations around syndication, which are:

  • Use the rel=canonical tag to help consolidate the PageRank of the stories and avoid any issues with Google (source: Search Engine Land)
  • Link back to the original article and provide attribution back to the original source

If you are not concerned about which site will rank for a piece of content than Newscred is a platform you should consider, if you qualify. Characterized as a content marketing platform, they have a syndication solution allowing brands to add content to their system, which is then hand-picked by their editorial staff.

If you get accepted into their publisher platform, you can show up on sites like Visa, Hartford or even Pepsi. In the Visa example, you can see that Gigaom, The Next Web, etc. all get exposure through their content, but there are no links or canonical back to the original article. There’s just one line that says “This article was written by Kevin Fitchard from GigaOm and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.”

Other Tools You May Want to Rethink

Other tools like Zemanta and PRNewswire are often mentioned as another distribution channel. Zemanta claims that they place links back to your site on credible sites in your arena. If you really manage it daily, this is probably true. If you don’t, it’s a disaster. We started showing up on Chinese language sites (which we only operate in the U.S.), X-rated sites and mom and pop sites about raising kids (we are strictly B2B), so it wasn’t valuable for the audience or for us.

PR Newswire and other PR distribution sites are also not a great option if you are trying to drive links or traffic. If, and only if, your content is of value to the media should you use these channels. I may be old school, but my background in public relations still holds true—don’t make it all about you when pitching to the media, make it about them.

Native Advertising: What Is It Exactly?

Native advertising this, programmatic that. The buzzwords fly freely, but does anyone ever take a moment to really explain what the heck is going on in plain English? The reality is that new “trends” are really old ones, re-packaged or spun a bit, and that is definitely the case with native advertising. So what is it, how does it work, and how can you get in on the action? Keep reading.

What Is It?

Simply put, native advertising is a form of sponsored content. Wherever it is, be it Twitter, Facebook or your website, it looks like it’s supposed to be there. It is the definition of contextual. Let’s take a promoted pin, for instance: (more…)

Native Advertising: What Is It Exactly?

Native advertising this, programmatic that. The buzzwords fly freely, but does anyone ever take a moment to really explain what the heck is going on in plain English? The reality is that new “trends” are really old ones, re-packaged or spun a bit, and that is definitely the case with native advertising. So what is it, how does it work, and how can you get in on the action? Keep reading.

What Is It?

Simply put, native advertising is a form of sponsored content. Wherever it is, be it Twitter, Facebook or your website, it looks like it’s supposed to be there. It is the definition of contextual. Let’s take a promoted pin, for instance:

Pinterest ad mockup via Digidayvia Pinterest as published by Digiday

 The pin looks and acts like all the other pins, but down at the bottom, you’ll see that it’s marked as “promoted.” Facebook and Twitter are two other big ones that employ native advertising, which they disperse among the content you’ve chosen to see by following or liking.

If you think about it like television, commercials are to traditional advertising as product placement is to native advertising (so long as it doesn’t change the format of the show).

In August 2014, a study by 614 Group and OneSpot revealed some pretty impressive stats:

  • 69 percent of marketers believe that native advertising is valuable
  • 22 percent view it as the future of digital advertising
  • 52 percent of marketers assert that getting to right level of scale is their job No. 1 for native advertising and content marketing
  • 87 percent employ their own websites as a means to promote content
  • 80 percent use social networks

How Does It Work?

In traditional advertising, let’s say for a magazine, editorial and advertising are kept very separate. The editorial team is charged with creating content that is within the voice of the publication, and at it’s core, promotes their mission and brand values. The nature of editorial is truthful and journalistic, and is the main reason why readers will patronize a publication—because they trust it. There is no ulterior motive in editorial besides telling a story in the way the writer intended it to be told.

Native advertising blurs the lines. Take Forbes’ March 2015 cover, for instance:

Forbes cover March 2015 native advertising

This move was a bold one. Typically, what is now known as “native advertising” lived in the back of a magazine, where sponsored content existed but looked and acted very different from editorial content. This new iteration of native advertising made many feel like they were being misled, and the journalists weren’t too happy about it either. Former staff tweeted that they had “just sold-off its last bit of editorial integrity” and were “pushing forward the complete bastardization of journalism”.

The difference between the Forbes example and Pinterest might be subtle, but it’s clear: in order to maintain the trust of your audience and/or potential customers, be clear about your motives.

How Can You Get In On the Action? 

As a B2B marketer, you’ve probably already been thinking about how exactly you can get in on the native advertising action. If you’re using Pinterest, Twitter, and Facebook, it’s relatively easy—promoted pins, tweets and posts are a regular part of their advertising products now.

Native advertising example Dell on Business.com
Additionally, most B2B publications are prepared for native advertising. Business.com was built to be a native platform, and the opportunity for sponsoring native content was baked into our new design. Want in on the Business.com native action? Contact us.

Native advertising on business.com CA

If you’re looking to create native advertising opportunities for your clients and customers, this is a good time to get to it.

The logical (and most important) place to start is to create for the mindset that native advertising is a marriage of the minds between editorial and sales. Native advertising should present the message of the advertiser in the voice of the publication, while making sure that it’s clear to your audience that the content is sponsored.

In order to do this well, you need to get all stakeholders onboard, and early. Make sure your sales team is talking to your content/editorial team before promising anything to an advertiser. Talk to your design about how you’ll differentiate sponsored native content from published editorial. Talk to tech about how it will be implemented.

Small Business Finds The Internet… It Only Took Two Decades [Survey]

Where would we be without the Internet? We’d still be using paper maps, calling restaurants to make reservations, listening to CDs and reading newspapers. And Business.com,”like millions of other companies, wouldn’t be around.

Clearly, the Internet isn’t going anywhere, but it’s taken quite some time for the mom and pop shops of America to really get their heads (and wallets) around marketing on this juggernaut. Year over year, small business Internet marketing spend increases, and according to the SMB Internet Marketing Survey by BrightLocal and Chamberofcommerce.com, 37% of these SMBs are planning to increase their spend on internet marketing yet again in 2015.

Of the 736 SMBs surveyed, 29% allocate more than 70% of their marketing budget to online channels. This stat alone is an indication that Internet marketing has become of increasing importance to the local businesses of America as technology and opportunities improve. In fact, since 2013, “there has been a 16% rise in SMBs that plan to increase their Internet marketing spend over the next 12 months.” (more…)

Small Business Finds The Internet… It Only Took Two Decades [Survey]

Where would we be without the Internet? We’d still be using paper maps, calling restaurants to make reservations, listening to CDs and reading newspapers. And Business.com, like millions of other companies, wouldn’t be around.

Clearly, the Internet isn’t going anywhere, but it’s taken quite some time for the mom and pop shops of America to really get their heads (and wallets) around marketing on this juggernaut. Year over year, small business Internet marketing spend increases, and according to the SMB Internet Marketing Survey by BrightLocal and Chamberofcommerce.com, 37% of these SMBs are planning to increase their spend on internet marketing yet again in 2015.

Internet Marketing Spend Increase Plans

Of the 736 SMBs surveyed, 29% allocate more than 70% of their marketing budget to online channels. This stat alone is an indication that Internet marketing has become of increasing importance to the local businesses of America as technology and opportunities improve. In fact, since 2013, “there has been a 16% rise in SMBs that plan to increase their Internet marketing spend over the next 12 months.”

The reasons behind the increased spend can be many, but one of the most important is the increasing effectiveness of Internet marketing. 75% of those surveyed find it to be “effective” or “very effective” at attracting customers. Only 20% said it was not effective, and 4% don’t do any Internet marketing at all. In their analysis, BrightLocal said “it is this increase in trust towards internet marketing that has persuaded 37% of SMBs to up their spending levels over next 12 months.”

Internet Marketing Effectiveness SMBs

So which channels are these SMBs finding the most success on? Next to word of mouth, they said that SEO (20%), online directories (15%), and email marketing (10%) are the most effective marketing channels. In our experience at Business.com, we’d agree that email marketing and SEO are effective channels, but the online directories stat gave us pause upon reading. But, given that the majority of the businesses surveyed in this report are self-taught and not in the business of the internet, it’s not surprising that they’d be a few years behind in their perception of what’s working versus what’s trending in Internet marketing.

Though word of mouth is considered to be an offline channel in this survey, review sites like Yelp are contributing to word of mouth marketing for businesses: “the impact of a great reputation which is shared widely online can earn businesses lots more customers.” The growing importance of online word of mouth will continue to fuel Internet marketing spend for SMBs as they realize the impact it has on their business.

Online Marketing Channel Effectiveness

Though the majority of the SMBs surveyed consider a phone call to their business as the best success metric of their marketing efforts, 40% of respondents said that traffic to their websites and search rankings are the most important. Another 14% said that website inquiries are of the highest value. When compared to the “in-person” success metrics of phone calls and actual customers walking through the door (45%), the online metrics are the clear winner (54%). This is a clear indication that spend will continue on its upward trend as SMBs pursue improvement in these metrics.

Internet Marketing Success Metrics

Of the 18% of SMBs that use a consultant or agency to handle their online marketing efforts, only 11% are not satisfied with the results. Most impressive is the respondents that “love them, think they’re brilliant”—up 30% from last year from 9%! This surprised me. Because small businesses tend to have small budgets for marketing, it could be deduced that when they do empty their pockets on an agency, they have high expectations. For so many SMBs to feel satisfied with their agencies not only indicates that the consultants are not only doing their jobs better, but perhaps that SMBs better understand what value they bring and how they do so. This is great news for Internet marketing agencies.

Marketing consultant performance and sentiment

Similarly, with each passing year SMB owners are becoming more interested in Internet marketing, and are making efforts to learn how they can best apply it to their business. Many SMBs struggle with limited resources including time and money, but the majority of those surveyed are dedicated to taking a DIY-approach to Internet marketing. Only 2% say they’re not interested in Internet marketing for their business.

Attitudes towards internet marketing SMBs

As we get well on our way with 2015, one thing is very clear about Internet marketing for small business: it’s here to stay. This is good news for all of us in the business of making money online, but to me, the most important takeaway from the SMB Internet Marketing Survey is that we continue to see an increased understanding and investment in online marketing efforts across the board from big brands to your favorite family-owned restaurant. With this outlook, the only way to go is up. Here’s to a year full of Internet marketing for ALL!

An Intro to Paid Search by Business.com’s SEM Analyst

Search engine marketing is an important focus for us at Business.com. In an effort to make sure everyone in the company understands what it really is, I presented an overview of paid search during one of our lunchtime learning sessions. So I figured, why not share it with all of you as well?

This presentation was designed for people who have heard about SEM but do not have direct knowledge about it. We explored the very basics of how search engine marketing works, and all the basic tenants of paid search. Here’s the rundown.

What is paid search?

  • Paid search, or search engine marketing, is the management of ads that show next to organic search engine results. Advertisers can get traffic to their website on a cost-per-click basis.
  • Like anything, paid search takes time and money to run effectively.
  • Typically users that search for a keyword on a search engine have high intent. They either wish to buy an item or wish to learn more about something. This is one of the advantages of paid search compared to other paid advertising channels.

(more…)

An Intro to Paid Search by Business.com’s SEM Analyst

Search Engine Marketing SEMSearch engine marketing is an important focus for us at Business.com. In an effort to make sure everyone in the company understands what it really is, I presented an overview of paid search during one of our lunchtime learning sessions. So I figured, why not share it with all of you as well?

This presentation was designed for people who have heard about SEM but do not have direct knowledge about it. We explored the very basics of how search engine marketing works, and all the basic tenants of paid search. Here’s the rundown.

What is paid search?

  • Paid search, or search engine marketing, is the management of ads that show next to organic search engine results. Advertisers can get traffic to their website on a cost-per-click basis.
  • Like anything, paid search takes time and money to run effectively.
  • Typically users that search for a keyword on a search engine have high intent. They either wish to buy an item or wish to learn more about something. This is one of the advantages of paid search compared to other paid advertising channels.

Some facts and figures about paid search:

  • Google owns 2/3 of the US market share for search engine traffic. Bing owns just less than 1/3.
  • There are 40,000 search queries on Google every second.
  • Google’s advertising revenues in 2012 were $42.5 billion.

As you can see, there are a lot of people searching for things, and advertisers are willing to pay real money to get those people to come to their website.

What can you use paid search for?

  • Ecommerce/Retail: Amazon, Macy’s, Nike all use paid search to drive product sales
  • Lead Generation: We use paid search here at Business.com to identity people interested in a product and service. Then we match these people with advertisers that provide that service
  • Website Traffic/Branding: Companies can send paid traffic to their website to increase brand awareness

Others have also used paid search to drive people to special offers on their website, to collect emails for their database or to collect donations. The uses of paid search are only limited by the website that the paid click drives to.

Here’s an example of a paid search ad:

Example of paid search ad

You have undoubtedly seen this screen before. After searching for a keyword (in this instance, “Nike running shoes”) you are shown a screen with a combination of ads and organic search results.

Notice that the paid ad space takes up a majority of the screen. When these ads align with exactly what the user is looking for, that’s when people will click on your ad.

Paid search management is all about matching a compelling ad to the relevant keywords.

If you are a business, you’ll have to balance your costs with your revenue. Each paid search click costs you money. So, you must think about how much you are willing to pay per click. This depends on your average revenue per visitor, or some other performance metric you are trying to optimize for.

When you choose the keywords you wish to advertise on, you can set a maximum CPC (cost per click) for each keyword. We’ll go over that, and some other details about the economics of paid search in the next section.

Basic Terminology

For clarity’s sake, let’s go over some basic terminology:

  • Keyword: the search query that you choose to show ads on.
  • Ad: the ad you write which will be shown for keywords that you bid on.
  • Max CPC: the maximum amount of money you are willing to pay if someone clicks on your ad.
  • CTR: Percentage of the time users click on your ad (as opposed to clicking on organic results or someone else’s ad).
  • Quality Score: the search engine’s 1-10 measure of the relevancy of your ad. This number is calculated mainly from your adcopy’s CTR, but also factors in your landing page experience, and a few other lesser factors.SEM example max CPC

Now that we’ve gotten some definitions out of the way, let’s take a look at what’s going on under the hood.

The Auction

Every time a user searches on a search engine, there is an auction that takes place in a fraction of a second. The advertiser with the highest ad rank gets shown in the number 1 ad spot. The advertiser with the second highest ad rank gets put in position 2, and so on.

Here is the formula for calculating your ad rank for a given keyword you are bidding on:

Max CPC * Quality Score = Ad Rank

This is a simple and elegant system that rewards advertisers for 1) bidding more money or 2) having a more relevant ad.

At the same time that Google calculates your ad rank, they also calculate the ad rank for all the advertisers that are competing with you. At the end, it shows ads in order of their ad rank.

Using The Auction To Your Advantage

This formula has a few implications for the achievement of your goals. As a marketer, your goals are probably something along the lines of this:

1) You want your ad to be seen by and clicked by as many people as possible and;

2) You also want to pay the least amount of money possible for each click.

The interesting thing is that these two objectives are actually contradictory. According to the formula above, if quality score is equal across all competitors, you need to increase your max CPC to get a better ad rank. So, you pay more money per click. Compounding this, the higher ad rank will cause your ads to get more clicks due to being in a higher position, and those additional clicks will cost you even more money.

Consider the opposite situation. If you bid lower, you will pay less money per click. But then your ad will be shown on a lower position on the page so you will also get fewer clicks, which will also decrease your advertising costs. Thus, the decreased CPC and decreased click volume work together to lower your costs.

As a search marketer, you have to strike a balance between price per click and the click volume you get. If you try and earn the number 1 or 2 spot all the time, you will need to bid high and that will cost you.

Can you afford the top ad positions? Often times it is much better to show ads on a lower position, because the price per click lends itself to overall profitability.

Closing Thoughts

We have just scratched the surface of search engine marketing. Search engines are collecting all sorts of data on user behavior and make it available to their advertisers so that they can improve their paid search efforts. Some advanced topics include:

  • Ad copy testing: testing different ad messaging to improve click-through-rate
  • Geographic targeting: analyzing ad performance segmented by geographic region
  • Time of day optimization: analyzing performance based on time of day or day of the week
  • Ad extensions: managing add-ons for your ads that increase its credibility and visibility. These often take the form of modules that convey your company’s Google+ rating, store address, or number of followers on social media next to your basic ad text.

All in all, the data driven nature of paid search and the real-time auctions are what set it apart from traditional media buying. Check back here periodically for future articles on more advanced topics in paid search.

Questions? Feel free to leave one in the comments section.

Future Selling: The Role of Ad Tech and Programmatic in B2B Media

Two weeks ago, I spoke at the Business Information & Media Summit on the impact of ad technology and programmatic buying on B2B media. The title of my talk: “Future Selling in B2B Media: Yes, there is a future.”

To give you a sense of perspective, #BIMS14 brought together 400 senior executives from business media, information, data and software companies ranging from some of the largest in the world, to start ups.

Related Article: B2B Marketing in 2014: The Trends, Successes and More

It was an audience of smart, experienced professionals, many of whom are still struggling with the havoc that the Internet has wrought on their traditional media and information businesses. To create a sense of context, I started with the major milestones that have shaped the digital landscape in which we currently live and do business:

  • 1995: Birth of the commercial web
  • 2000: First phase of the Internet as a platform
  • 2004: Social Networks introduced
  • 2006: Online targeting emerges
  • 2014: The Intention-Based revolution begins

(more…)